Vitamin B6, plasma

Alphabetical Test listing

Vitamin B6, plasma-13329

  
Vitamin B6, plasma
  
13329
  
LAB13329
  
VB6
  
B6
B6, vitamin
PLP
Pyridoxal-5-phosphate
Pyridoxine
  

Detect vitamin B(6) deficiency

  
EDTA plasma
  
  
0.5 mL
  
0.25 mL
  

Immediatley following collection, mix sample thoroughly by gentle inverting 8 - 10 times, to prevent clotting

  
  1. Spin
  2. Transfer plasma to a Amber transfer vial/tube - 12 mL (LabCorp), labelled as EDTA plasma

 

  

Protect from light

Refrigerated (preferred) - 15 days

Frozen - 15 days

Ambient - 3 days

 

  
  • Anticoagulants other than EDTA
  • Specimen not protected from light
  
LabCorp Burlington (004655): R-LC
  
Daily
  
3 - 5 days
  

Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS-MS)

  

Male:     5.3−46.7 μg/L

Female: 2.0−32.8 μg/L

  

Vitamin B6 deficiency can occur in individuals with a variety of genetic conditions including antiquitin deficiency,21 pyridox(am)ine-5'-phosphate oxidase (PNPO) deficiency22 and hyperprolinemia type II (pyrroline-5- carboxylate dehydrogenase deficiency. 23 Vitamin B6 levels can be decreased in malabsorption conditions including inflammatory disease of the small bowel and as a consequence of jejunoileal bypass. Several drugs, including oral contraceptive agents, levodopa, isoniazid, cycloserine, and pyrazinoic acid may cause B6 depletion. B6 levels may be decreased with pregnancy, lactation and alcoholism. Infants can develop deficiency when fed formula rendered B6 depleted by excessive heating.

  
84207
  
04/11/2019
  
11/11/2019